Your State’s Unemployment Tax Laws: Massachusetts

We at Unemployment Solutions for You proudly offer our unemployment claims management services across the United States. We are a leader in our industry not only because we offer an outstanding product, but also because we have a deep knowledge-base in the many differing unemployment laws across the 50 states. Part of our mission is to also educate you about how these laws may differ from state to state because they can affect you directly. So, join us on our continuing series, in which we explore the differences in unemployment eligibility, tax rate ranges, base periods, and much more in each state. This month, in Your State’s Unemployment Tax Laws, we’ll be looking at Massachusetts. For most employers in the state of Massachusetts, contributions to the unemployment insurance tax must be made if you have any employees working one or more days in each of 13 weeks during a calendar year. Alternatively, if you pay wages in excess of $1,500 in any calendar quarter, you are required to pay the UI tax. However, there are some industries that are held to different standards. Certain industries such as agriculture, domestic workers, and out-of-state employers have different criteria they must meet as outlined below. Agriculture: these employers become liable for UI contributions once total cash wages of $40,000 or more have been paid in a calendar quarter or 10 or more individuals were employed on any day in each of 20 weeks in a year. Domestic Workers: these employers become liable for UI contributions once $1,000 or more in wages has been paid in any calendar quarter. Out-of-State Employers: these employers...

Your State’s Unemployment Tax Laws: Nevada

We at Unemployment Solutions for You proudly offer our unemployment claims management services across the United States. We are a leader in our industry not only because we offer an outstanding product, but also because we have a deep knowledge-base in the many differing unemployment laws across the 50 states. Part of our mission is to also educate you about how these laws may differ from state to state because they can affect you directly. So, join us on our continuing series, in which we explore the differences in unemployment eligibility, tax rate ranges, base periods, and much more in each state. This month, in Your State’s Unemployment Tax Laws, we’ll be looking at Nevada. In the state of Nevada, “employing units,” which are considered to be any individual or organization involved in a partnership, association, trust, estate, joint-stock company, insurance company, corporation, or receiver/trustee in bankruptcy, must register with the Employment Security Division (ESD) and pay taxes on wages paid in excess of $225 during any calendar quarter. If an employing unit falls under these criteria, a Taxable Wage Base amount must be multiplied by an annual unemployment tax rate to determine the amount of an employer’s UI tax liability. Nevada’s Taxable Wage Base is calculated annually to be 2/3 percent of the average annual wage for Nevada employees. These wages must be reported to the ESD each quarter for each employee under an employing unit. However, any wages paid to each employee, which exceed the Taxable Wage Base during the calendar year are not taxed. The following table details the most recent Taxable Wage Base amounts in...